Ashamed of my country

“You must not lose faith in humanity. Humanity is an ocean; if a few drops of the ocean are dirty, the ocean does not become dirty.” – M. Gandhi

In the aftermath of the results from the US election, the whole world is left in shock as Donald Trump takes the keys to the white house, maybe the exception of this shock is Britain. Having our own moment of foolishness earlier this year with ‘Brexit’, we are well aware that anything is possible. Many of us are now aware what it feels like to be ashamed of our nationalities, something we once uttered with pride, now a shattered emblem upon the floor.

American and British citizens are arguably more united than ever through recent events, yet also are in despair of each other’s decisions they have made for their countries. Half of Brits believed the Brexit scare would pass. Half of America believed the Trump nightmare would end. But here we both are, many of us ashamed to show our faces to the rest of the world. The world looking to us with disappointment.

Yet this feeling is nothing new, we are only experiencing a taster of what it feels like to be blamed for something that is out of our hands. We placed our votes. The rest of our nations decided against us and we are feeling the wrath of their decisions.

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The first results that come up on Google.

But we would never hold innocent people accountable for someone of their race who commits terrible crimes, would we? This hasn’t been happening for hundreds of years to minority groups, has it?

We should not feel ashamed for our countries decisions; the shame should be felt from our own discrimination of other races. For example, Muslims have been looked down upon and made to feel shame for “.006625%”[i] of their population being extremist, when over 50% of Americans and Brits voted for promoters of racist, xenophobic and misogynist ideals.

As of now, nobody knows what is going to happen with Britain out of Europe or America with Trump as their president. But those who did not vote for these matters are not to blame and we should not be ashamed that we have been let down by our countries, but rather be the catalyst for a positive change and show the rest of the world that we are not all racist and many of us are just as devastated by the hate crimes that are happening as a consequence of these right-wing movements as the groups they are targeting.

As for myself, although I have fallen in love with Spain in a time I feel failed by my own country, I still cannot wait to be on that plane at Christmastime and see the rolling hills and patchwork farms of England, and oh-my-goodness I am well overdue for a good old Sunday roast and a hug from my family! This is the Great Britain I still love.

People should not be basing their pride in their nation, particularly in these disjointed times, but rather be proud of their own personal achievements and views.

[i] https://www.quora.com/How-many-extremist-Muslims-are-there-when-compared-with-the-wider-and-world-wide-Muslim-population

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Toma Cafe

On a rainy Sunday afternoon in Madrid, with my laptop on my knee after researching different columns for my ‘Opinion Journalism’ course, I decided I wanted to get out of the flat.

But what to do on a rainy day? After considering a soggy walk in the park, messaging a friend for suggestions for a group activity and endlessly waiting for their reply, dragging my reluctant boyfriend away from his game to do something, I settled on visiting a coffee shop on my own.

Now for most travellers, this is an everyday part of their life, but this was actually the first time I had decided to visit a coffee shop alone for no other reason but to take some time out. So first of all, I was panicking frantically searching for reviews of cafes in Madrid for solo travellers on TripAdvisor to no avail, although one cafe did catch my eye called ‘Toma Cafe,’ a seemingly quirky cafe just a few stops away from Canal on the metro.

So off I went, armed with my big fluffy hooded parka and bag with my ‘Diverso 1’ (my A1 Spanish Textbook) and my travel journal, unsure of what to do with my time alone in the coffee shop. Even though as a previous waitress in a coffee shop in England myself I have seen many people enjoying a cup of coffee or a spot of lunch alone, albeit elderly.

When I arrived at the cafe I must admit I walked past it the first time as it looked too crowded to sit down, but I circled back, kicking myself as this stupidity and entered the cafe.

To my surprise, as soon as I walked in the tiny cafe, I spotted many people having coffee alone. Some reading newspapers, others watching the world go by and a couple of people working on their laptops. So having a new found confidence, off I went to order my drink. I was pleasantly shocked to find out in this cafe they have cappuccinos, flavoured lattes and even my favourite – chai lattes – as well as selection of unusual and traditional cakes. I couldn’t help but order a ‘Chocolate Guinness’ Cake I had spotted out the corner of my eye with a cheeky grin from the friendly server. Well, maybe I had been staring at the cakes for a little while, mouth watering…

I then scuttled off to a chair on a long bench where two other people were sat alone and placed myself in the middle and began sipping my delicious chai latte and nibbling on the surprisingly tasty and moist slice of cake. I was completely contented, in fact, I preferred being alone in the coffee than if I had gone with a friend. I simply enjoyed my time away, amongst a crowd of different languages… french, german, spanish, english…, my journal in hand to jot down last weeks events, the lovely mellow pop playing complimenting the sound of the rain outside and the smell of proper coffee, no more ‘cafe con leche.’

So thanks to Toma Cafe, I will now be an avid solo coffee shop visitor, so thank you!